Building Talent Pipelines

How can hiring companies build real talent pipelines?


Protect Your Brand is a Limited Podcast Series. The Chad & Cheese call on a real cast of experienced characters including Gerry Crispin, Principal & Co-Founder of CareerXRoads, Deb Andrychuk, VP of Client Services with Shaker Recruitment Marketing and Steven Rothberg, Founder and President of CollegeRecruiter.com to answer the questions employers should be asking themselves.


Lead question: How are employers protecting their brands and talent pipelines by adapting their internship programs?


Support provided by our friends at Shaker Recruitment Marketing - COVID might keep us at home but it won't keep us quiet!

PODCAST TRANSCRIPTION sponsored by:

Disability Solutions helps companies find talent in the largest minority community in the world – people with disabilities.


VIDEO AVAILABLE HERE


Announcer:

Hide your kids. Lock the doors. You're listening to HR's most dangerous podcast. Chad Sowash and Joel Cheesman are here to punch the recruiting industry right where it hurts, complete with breaking news, brash opinion and loads of snark. Buckle up boys and girls, it's time for the Chad & Cheese Podcast.

Chad:

I'm Chad Sowash with the Chad & Cheese Podcast. Joined by ...

Joel:

Joel Cheesman, the cheese segment of the Chad and Cheese Podcast.

Chad:

Yeah, everybody can remember him. Gerry Crispin, the recruiting soothsayer, I think somebody has called you that before.

Gerry:

I'm here. I'm not about to call myself that.

Joel:

Soothsayer and sightseer.

Gerry:

I'm like a tiger of some sort.

Joel:

Tiger king. I like it.

Chad:

Tiger king of recruiting crossroads. We have Deb Andrew Truck. She is the industry veteran and VP of, I said recruitment branding goodness. I feel like that is Deb in good recruiting branding.

Deb:

That can be, I'm going to change my business card to say that.

Chad:

I like it.

Joel:

I like it.

Chad:

Over at Shaker Recruiting, Joel has a logo there to share. Last, but never, but always least, Steven Rothberg. Nobody can have a college recruiting discussion without Steven Rothberg actually popping his head in.

Joel:

Steve Rothberg Canadian. Welcome Steve.

Chad:

President, founder, collegerecruiter.com. The theme of today's discussion is protecting your brand in the realm of college recruiting. Steven, this one's going to you, buddy.

Steven:

Hey.

Chad:

Are you ready?

Steven:

As always.

Chad:

How are employers protecting their brands and talent pipelines by adapting their internship programs?

Steven:

Most of the large employers understand that their college recruiting programs, whether it's internships or new grads, are strategic. That's where their next generation of leaders come from. This small number who look at interns as chief sources of labor, or basically temporary help are doing a terrible job of protecting their brands. Those are the ones where we're seeing the biggest layoffs. Small startups who brought in a bunch of interns because they've got a project that needs done, and they had no intention of converting those interns into, well, we have to come up with a better word, permanent hires. No hire is permanent. The vast majority of the large employers, and it's the large employers who hire most students and recent grads. That's where the bulk of that hiring comes from. The vast majority of them I think are really trying hard to do the right thing. They're trying to do the right thing, not just because they're trying to protect that student, that grad, and do the right thing for that person, but they're also being mindful of their own business.

Steven:

By doing the right thing, you're doing the right thing for the candidate, and you're doing the right thing for your business. If they were to turn around and rescind their offers, then they lose this year's class, and they're probably also going to lose next year's class and the class the year after. Because every one of those students that has an offer rescinded, or just has the employer treat them like shit, is going to tell 5,000 of their closest friends on Facebook, Twitter.

Joel:

TikTok.

Steven:

Oh, you stole my thunder man. I was going to say, there's going to be Tik Tok videos with people doing little dances, talking about how they had their offer rescinded. As disturbing as that would be with just the dance thing, to lay that over would be even worse, but word will spread very quickly. You'll have career service offices counseling students to not accept an offer from the terrible employer A, and instead accept an offer from employer B. These big brands, I think it took them a couple of weeks to grasp the monumental problem that they faced. They have a huge cash flow problem. They have a huge problem in adapting the work so that these people can do meaningful work from home, but I feel like they almost all realized they needed to do it.

Steven:

I've actually been really amazed pleasantly at how unusual it is when we hear of big brands not doing it. They almost all are rising to the occasion. It's been very encouraging. It's been very collaborative.

Joel:

Gerry, one of the things with my military background, the Army, Navy, Air force, Marines, always amazing recruitment. Right? The process might not be great, but amazing recruitment. One thing I can't understand from companies is why they haven't started their ROTC programs, the Reserve Officer Training Corps types of programs, where they put them in and say, "Look, you're a recruit. You're coming in. You're going to be a developer at my organization. We're going to stick with you through these years, whatever it takes, but your hours, and we're going to pay for tuition or whatever that is. Why haven't companies adapted to be more advanced, because that is advanced, and that is true pipeline.

Gerry:

It's a long time since I've heard ideas like that, to be honest with you, probably 20, 30 years. What happened about 20 or 30 years ago was we stopped developing people. We want to hire people who can work today.

Joel:

Right.

Gerry:

The intern program is really the closest thing we have to job shadowing, but I get a chance to see and to buy later on. What Steven was talking about is not only do you lose the ability to get interns next year, if you screw up with the interns this year. That intern class that you have this year is actually where you get your early hires. Financial services probably the biggest example of that. Nearly 90% of all of their early hires come from their intern classes, their own intern classes in many cases, not just their competitors intern classes. The impact of this pipeline, if you will, is really intern to early hire. The truth of it is though that some companies could be doing some extraordinary things if they brought people in and made some promises for a longer term capability of developing that.

Gerry:

Now there are examples of that. In fact, in the city that Deb is in, you've got Enterprise Rent-A-Car. It's a great example of a company, that a huge percentage of their total hires, it used to be almost a hundred percent, basically come in at a single job. I wouldn't call it early hire because even if you retired and wanted to go work for Enterprise, that's the job you would get. Then from there, you can grow in a variety of different directions and from a development point of view. They could show that if you look at any mid-level or C-level person, the majority of them all started in the same exact place, in a store where they learned how to deal with the business at its base level. Those kinds of models though, are few and far between, and the majority of folks who do join companies from college often are gone within two, three, four years.

Gerry:

Some companies probably should be doing an ROI on what is the value longterm of bringing kids in, in that first job, because the investment in all of that doesn't really pay off for years. If companies did a better job of rethinking how they develop people for the longterm, they'd realize that they've lost a little bit of that investment possibility. You've raise a really important question. Corporations have to think more in the future about buy versus build, and early career hire interns are part of the build decision strategically. They should be thinking more longterm from that perspective.

Joel:

Chad, you're talking apprenticeships.

Chad:

Yeah, to an extent. I mean, we see this on the tech side more than we do anything else, but there's no reason why it can't be rolled over. Again, like in the ROTC program where the college is being paid for, and when you pop out of college, you are now in a three-year or four-year contract to be a developer on this level. During that timeframe, you've gone through some training, so when you come out you already know about that company. You've already been through training classes, probably certifications, corporate certifications, those types of things. At the end of that, you have a paid degree. You have a brand that you're going into, and again, that's a true pipeline.

Joel:

To me, most companies today are saying that they want to eliminate college degree as a requirement for a job, which offers a tremendous opportunity for a lot of people who've gotten good experience doing a lot of things, military, Peace Corps, a lot of other kinds of things, to coming into corporations, and then being part of a much bigger opportunity for apprenticeship, and college, and all of those things.

Chad:

You say companies want to do that. What's stopping them?