• Chad and Cheese

Coronavirus Edition


Best of times, worst of times ... while the coronavirus ravages the world and employers take notice, money continues to flow into startups and acquisitions in our space. Something's gotta give, right?

The boys discuss these two opposing forces in this week's episode while also finding time to discuss creeping propositioning by CEO's to women, compliments of LinkedIn.

Enjoy this Tamiflu-inspired episode, as always, sponsored by Canvas, JobAdx and Sovren.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPTION sponsored by:

Disability Solutions is your sourcing and recruiting partner for people with disabilities.

Intro:

Hide your kids, lock the doors. You're listening to HRS most dangerous podcast Chad Sowash and Joel Cheesman are here to punch the recruiting industry right where it hurts. Complete with breaking news, brash opinion and loads of snark. Buckle up boys and girls its time for the Chad and Cheese Podcast.

Joel:

Welcome to the black plague edition of the Chad and Cheese Podcast, boys and girls. I'm your barely surviving co-host Joel Cheesman

Chad:

And this is Chad. I am so glad I'm not in the same room as you Sowash.

Joel:

And on this week show, all big dick energy on the acquisition and investment front while the economy burns, of course. Workday is canceling and homie don't play that. Grab some Kleenex and pour yourself a hot cup of soup, we'll be right back after a massive intake of fluids.

Sovren:

Sovren Parser is the most accurate resume and job order intake technology in the industry. The more accurate your data, the better decisions you can make. Find out more about our suite of products today by visiting Sovren.com. That's Sovren.com. We provide technology that thinks, communicates and collaborates like a human. Sovren, software so human, you'll want to take it to dinner.

Joel:

I am your father.

Chad:

Yeah. So you got checked, you don't have the coronavirus, right?

Joel:

No coronavirus but Type A flu. I wasn't aware there were different types of flu but I have A. And I'm the final recipient of this lovely flu in our household, so I get to have a nice weekend apparently.

Chad:

Yeah, you just stay quarantined and away from the rest of the population that we would really appreciate.

Joel:

Roger that.

Chad:

And rest. So a couple of weeks ago you gave a shout out and I thought, you know what? I'm actually going to listen to this podcast. It's called Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson. The subject was job search, not entirely human resources. Dude, it was such garbage. I can't believe you actually told people to listen to this thing. We're going to have to do an interview that actually straightens out all this fluffy bullshit revisionist history stuff. Jeff Taylor, Dick Johnson. Dick Johnson was actually good. Arena was on it for God's sakes. I mean, dude it was a total fucking puff piece.

Joel:

After you just said, Dick Johnson was good on it. I appreciate that you want to come at me while I have the flu and my ability to fight back is minimized but, okay, so let's be specific. Did you feel they were lying? I mean Arena, whatever. I just thought that historical perspective of the two Superbowl ads, hot jobs rolling the dice, some history on Monster. I mean specifically, what did you hate about it? Was it lies? Was it-

Chad:

I mean mainly except again for the hot jobs commercial, which I thought was awesome. The rest of it is like they were setting up Monster, and Jeff Taylor was talking about Monster and the only reason monster.com actually existed is because The Monster Board was a piece of shit. TMP, actually took OCC, which was a better technology and The Monster Board and Monster. I mean Jeff did have a better flare to himself and better to marketing flair. So all they did was they took the OCC tech, redirected the tech to put it on, monster.com. With not The Monster Board but monster.com and put new colors on it. I didn't mind the pieces of the commercial on the Superbowl but it was so puffy. Maybe it wasn't that bad from somebody who was looking for a puff piece and you're a puff piece guy. But for a guy like me, I want to dive into the actual details and really figure out the real stories and it just wasn't there.

Joel:

This is a Generalist Podcast featuring Walter Isaacson, which I think you'll even agree is a reputable personality and professional.

Chad:

He did no research.

Joel:

I didn't spin the show as deep insight into the industry. It sounds you're just mad that your former employer, OCC wasn't mentioned at all.

Chad:

That dude did no research whatsoever. He was a puff piece. That's a thing.

Joel:

He's telling a story. He's not doing critical interviewing and reporting.

Chad:

It was fucking horrible.

Joel:

And you are a tough critic. God damn.

Chad:

Sometimes our shit's bad too.

Joel:

I mean, take it for what it's for, it was not a Geraldo 2020, 60 minutes deep dive into the industry. It was a little story about a time in place.

Chad:

It was a puff piece.

Joel:

I'm going to give a shout out to Tamiflu, which is actually making me even able to talk to you today. Tamiflu, miracle drug if you're on the flu, Tamiflu.

Chad:

Tamiflu.

Joel:

Available at Walgreens, CVS and Rite Aid near you.

Chad:

And hopefully the following people do not have to take the Tamiflu. Tyler Weeks from Intel, who's the head of HR Data Science, Allyn Bailey TA Transformation Leader at Intel and Bill Neff, the VP of Consumer Marketing at Yeti, to be able to get those guys on the stage and have a holistic discussion of brand and how talent does either positively or negatively affect consumer brand. It was really interesting that it... I mean onstage, you could see it actually hit Bill in the face and he's like, "Fuck. This is incredibly relevant." So thanks to those guys.

Joel:

So to me, if there's any teaser it was CMO of Yeti saying he had never heard of employer branding until our conversation. So to me this is a timely, very important podcast for industry as well as marketing. So if you're in TA share this episode with your marketing department, I think it's a must listen for them and hopefully can get some dialogue started if there isn't any in your organization between TA and marketing.

Chad:

The title of the podcast is called Brand Revelation

Joel:

And let's not forget SmashFly and Symphony Talent for sponsoring the event. Big ups to Elise and Gina for being there and always been awesome. Shout out to... I'm going to screw this up. [Levan Van Hiza 00:07:03]. Levan is out of Belgium and he runs House of HR, I spoke at their event last year. Anyway, he is going to unleash a UK, which will be at the... I don't know, the sister event TA tech. And he's attending because he heard our show. So he's buying a ticket so you're welcome. unleash Levan will see you in London and have some Belgian beers hopefully.

Chad:

Yeah, no shit. Quick shout out to Fama.io CEO Ben Mones. He took some hard questions around social media monitoring. I mean, from the privacy standpoint, from the idea of big brother watching you, no matter where you're at on Twitter or on Facebook, what or wherever it might be. It's an eerie feeling. Then this is under the podcast entitled Somebody's Watching me, so check it out

Joel:

And I want to apologize to you for all the sniffles and coughs that you're going to have to edit out on this show, much apologies. Shout out to Layton Davison, a student out in Calgary, Canada. Who has attended two gatherings in a row and recognized us last week because he was so impressed with our first podcast from the show that he wanted to give us some love at the show. So Layton Davidson man keep studying. Get that degree and maybe you'll be on the show one day.

Chad:

He's a good dude. Big shout out Michael O'Dell at talent.com. Thanks for the socks, man. The only problem, the first pair that came in a package with my name on it was taken by my wife, so I made a mention on LinkedIn. "Wait a minute, she took my socks." So he sent another pair but it was addressed to her. So now she has both pair of socks. talent.com socks I have not.

Joel:

That's just good stuff Michael O'Dell, I like that. Yeah, I got a pair of socks too. Thanks, I appreciate that. A shout out to Shelly Norske. You may or may not remember Shelly from dinner the first night at Banff and the large crowd of people that we had eating workers. But Shelly's now a fan of the show, a marketing person. We need all those folks we can get. Shelly, if you're listening welcome to the show, we had a great time and we'll see you next year in Banff, I'm sure.

Chad:

Excellent new listener, Ollie Kilvert. He's turned on to the podcast after Rob Prince over at Talent Nexus posted the late arriving holiday card. I said, "Okay. So it was a little bit late for Valentine's day, even though it was intended for much earlier."

Joel:

Feel the love. I want to know what the post date was on that when it left the States. Because it had to be in December and it didn't show up until now. But anyway, shout out to Carlos Gill. We'll be producing that interview and putting it out soon. But Carlos is on marketing new age, a social media guy that has a history in job boards that we dig into. But I would be remiss if I didn't give a shout out to Carlos for being a longtime fan and listener of the show. And if you haven't read his book, the end of marketing, I encourage you to go out and check that out on amazon.com or wherever you enjoy your books.

Chad:

Very nice. Ready for events.

Joel:

I have one more, shout out to Fred Goff, our buddy at Jobcase in Boston. Fred made a really nice LinkedIn post, I think it was last week where he said, "Look, if we're going to be in the industry, we should support companies that are doing great things with employees." And printed out the Delta who've we've talked about in terms of giving money for revenue. Revenue generated by the company. So Fred is saying basically, "Hey, if we believe in this industry, let's support those companies. I'm flying Delta from now on." So good for Fred, I like that move.

Chad:

Luckily I am already doing that Fred.

Joel:

Of course Delta's probably either a client or he wants them to be a client at some point in the near future. But that's the cynic in me. Sorry.

Chad:

Always looking for the angle. All right, events. So Travel is sponsored by Shaker Recruitment Marketing. We just receiving upgraded gear. We just received upgraded gear. So soccer jerseys. You got a soccer Jersey, right?

Joel:

Yeah. That's football for our European listeners.

Chad:

Got a North face vest and also a Nike golf quarter zip.

Joel:

They have upped the game significantly from last year.

Chad:

Yeah. Well, I mean last year we got luggage and stuff. So I mean I can't bitch about that. But man.

Joel:

No hate at all.

Chad:

No. Good stuff. Good stuff. And that's going to help us propel to our next place in London. Hopefully fingers crossed and this coronavirus fucking thing goes away. On Lynch and TA tech have a mega conference in London in March.

Joel:

Death match baby, are you ready?

Chad:

Yeah. Fuck yeah. JobSync, Get-Optimal, SBOJ. How can you not? We have one slot still available. It's interesting how over in Europe and the UK, they don't like to really get up on stage and really just pitch their stuff. They're more subdued in the background. We're here in the U.S. we can't keep the fucking startups from wanting to get on stage.

Joel:

I'm sorry but, touting my company might be against my protocol for a decency of a civilization and society. Yeah, it is an interesting cultural shift where in the U.S. people who have companies are more than happy to talk shit about their stuff. And in the UK it's like pulling teeth or be it crooked teeth because-

Chad:

And if you don't have tickets, go to TAtech.org or unleashgroup.io and then after that we are heading to Austin. Giddy up Staffing tech May 5th through the seventh.

Joel:

Yep. And don't forget my friends at Rec Techs had a good laugh about me calling their conference, "Some sort of recruiting event in Vancouver." Which I actually don't know yet what that event is called or what it is, but I will be in Vancouver April 6th and 7th. So if you're out there riding orchids or snow skiing, come out and say hi and we'll have a beer.

Chad:

Writing Orcas, yeah. You have fun up there I don't need any more of the cold fucking shit, I want to go to Austin. I want to go to Austin if I take Julie, she's going to want to buy more boots. But anyway, amazing staffing leaders at Staffing Tech, a ton of startups and vendors. Just overall, it's a great event.

Joel:

Agreed.

Chad:

Topics!

Joel:

All right. Big acquisition to the tune of one. It's a weird number, 1.3 whatever billion, 5, 3 billion. Cornerstone and Saba get married. Okay, cool. My take is the education play frankly. I think the online learning stuff that Saba brings or does currently is in high demand and going to be in the future and any of these companies are realizing that and made the play. Wall Street didn't like it very much, Cornerstone in addition to shitty earnings and a shitty just environment for stocks right now is down 20 plus percent. What are your thoughts on the news?

Chad:

Yeah, I think that there's no question that had something to do with it, but the stock market started tanking the day before with the whole coronavirus piece, which we'll talk about later. Yeah, I think-

Joel:

Not 20%, it didn't.

Chad:

If you take a look at what Cornerstone and Saba both do recruiting on the new talent attraction side of the house. Learning of the LMS and then performance and coaching. So you can see where this is nice to be able to... In some respects definitely start acquiring competition. Overall, they have 75 million combined users, 818 million and combined ARR. And if you think about it, more users equals more data equals feed the AI machine learning beast, right? So with all this AI and machine learning that's out there, we've been talking about and I think we actually talked to Robert Ruff from Sovren. That the AI machine learning obviously is one piece but you have to have the data to feed, to learn before the AI is even worth a shit. So I get from this standpoint where it makes sense. You're taking a competitor out of the game, right? You're absorbing that competitor. Saba's CEO Phil Saunders, he's going to take the COO position until the merger is complete. And then more than likely he's going to say, "bye, bye." But yeah, I think it's a pretty easy math equation. Don't you think?

Joel:

There are a lot of facets to this deal. The release CEO and founder of Cornerstone, Adam Miller summed that up for me in quote, "Saba and Cornerstone have always shared a passion for people development and together we can accomplish great things. The additional depth of expertise and capability from Saba is an ideal compliment to Cornerstone. With the combination of our product development team is expected to significantly expand, giving us the ability to develop faster, further increase competitive differentiation. Help millions of people around the world to overcome the skills divide." So there you go, that summed it up for me.

Chad:

Well, and don't forget that in January Cornerstone bought Cluster Tree. An AI based skills engine, which has a pretty massive skills ontology. So the engine uses machine learning to help companies match their employees skills with specific job roles. So we're talking about external and the prospect of internal, right? So it's not just about getting the right people coming in the door to the right jobs. It's also about having your people that currently work for you. Mapping to career progression and succession.

Joel:

I want to see Cornerstone and StepStone merge to create. Stepping on the cornerstone. That's what I want to see.

Chad:

Not the angle I thought you were going with that one.

Joel:

That's the flu right there my friend.

Chad:

The online learning angle though, Udemy. Just got, was it 50 million.

Joel:

Udemy with 50 million to focus... Again, back to the learning piece, the growth piece. Obviously companies need folks to stay in step with current trends, new technologies, everything that's coming out. So yeah, Udemy which I know a lot of companies swear by raising 50 million this week. It's good to see the money's still coming in to this space and we'll talk about the economy here in a little bit. But this was a great move by Udemy, 2 billion valuation, which is still peanuts for what they could be.

Chad:

Yeah. To over 220 million overall they've taken this far, so another round, $50 million online learning marketplace. It's definitely a thing and as we talk about talent, whether we currently have them or we need them to be able to have these new skills, we've got to do it some way and this is a great way to be able to make that connection.

Joel:

Yeah, and this'll be interesting as recession threats loom, I guess. How do companies treat current talent bases and current employees in terms of retraining and repositioning as opposed to laying off? I guess time will tell on that. But companies like Udemy help reposition employees for other jobs in the company. Timing's probably right on these guys getting some new money.

Chad:

Yeah. Well and talking about new money and Telecare lands 45 million in series B. And Telecare is a Massachusetts based startup with an app that lets post acute facilities, hire on demand nursing professionals. It's like the Uber.

Joel:

Uber for nursing home staff. Which I can tell you, our interview with Saundra from Ageless, which I know is coming out as well. We were really surprised to see someone with Amazon and coach in their resume go to a nursing home or assisted living home. But the trend in terms of boomers getting old and this is going to be a huge growth opportunity for a lot of businesses as well as companies that service them and the nurses that service their customers. So in terms of timing again in Telecare nursing home, Uber getting nurses the right place to me, this is also very interesting. Was it Nomad Health that we talked about was an Uber. Uber for Healthcare jobs as well. This is where the gig economy is going. I think we both agree in terms of niche defying themselves and really specializing in certain areas. Healthcare is an obvious gig economy fit, so I anticipate more companies this getting money and this continuing to be a growth area for our industry.

Chad:

Yeah. And it says for nursing professionals, join our team and start picking up shifts in less than 72 hours. So again, if you are already working a gig but you want to or a full time position and you want to be able to pick up hours somewhere else, you could do that. That's pretty fucking awesome. I think one of the problems I see here is, in most cases the actual talent pool itself is already overworked so it's going to be hard to get people to join into that. Because it's like, "I'm already working enough over time as it is. I don't want to pick up any more fucking shifts." But I guess this can actually shift back to you become a part of this platform and then you just work where you want to work when you want to work. It's an entirely different type of lifestyle though, man.

Joel:

Yeah, and I think the number is one in four people who actually have a nursing degree are actually practicing nursing. So if a more flexible platform or space can help bring some of those 75% that have a degree but aren't working in the industry back into it, that's going to be a huge win for healthcare and maybe the gig economy can help do that.

Chad:

This is what I define as a marketplace. It's not a job board, it's actually more of an app where you can really flow back and forth with talent, you know what I mean? There's a need, there's a demand, and then there obviously is the feeding that demand with the talent in the actual app itself. So this is something that I would definitely place in the marketplace segment, versus some of the other I think platforms that are out there that really are just more job boards in there or anything else.

Joel:

Yeah, yeah. I see what you did there. Think of Uber when you think of platforms. Right. Like, "Hey, I'm ready to work." "Okay, here are jobs." They're ready to go there's no posting, it's automatic. There's a need and the platform just facilitates the two getting together and making miracles happen.

Chad:

Yeah. Well, and I think it's important to start to differentiate between what tech is, right? Is it a job board? Is it a marketplace? Is it programmatic? Is it just pure job distribution? Because there's so much noise out there. We have to cut through that clutter.

Joel:

And speaking of non posers, let's get a quick word from canvas and we'll talk about the economy going in the toilet.

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Chad:

Now you don't hear this often, but I think Workday made a damn good decision on this next story. What do you think?

Joel:

Prudent for sure. They had an event that was going to draw out 3000 participants to Florida.

Chad:

Sales kickoff.

Joel:

Globally. Events are canceling all over the world and one of the biggest ones is the Mobile Congress that happens every year in Spain. That was the big one that's stopped early. Which brings people from all over the world for sure. So Workday is no surprise. And by the way it's a shitty time to be in the conference business but we're not in the commerce business. But yeah. So the news out I guess today, wasn't it? Or Wednesday actually. So yesterday Workday canceled its annual internal sales meeting over fears of the coronavirus outbreak and will be moving the program online. We'll see if that stays online and years to come. But it was bringing people from around the country I think.

Chad:

Yeah. Well and over the weekend South Korea, Italy and Iran reported a sharp increase in cases. So I mean there has to be prudent measures that are taken by organizations. Facebook canceled a San Francisco based global marketing summit. Facebook and Sony also pulled out of marches game developers conference in San Francisco. So there's a couple of different things. First off, this is incredibly smart and it makes a lot of sense but it's also going to affect the economy in those cities because those cities are looking for that dump of cash when they

have these conferences in.

Joel:

I mean imagine what it would do to work forces, profits if their entire sales team got the coronavirus or got sick. They would probably shut things down at the company for a while and it would impact revenues quite significantly-

Chad:

Well, what if it was their sales force because that's exactly-

Joel:

Exactly. So good idea to not get your whole sales force sick. I think it will be interesting to see... There's no remedy cure for this virus and no one knows exactly what it's going to look like six weeks. Let alone six months from now but obviously affecting the HR conference circuit. I mean, I think... Nestle today shut down all travel from everyone in the company and that's tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of employees worldwide. Shit's going to get crazy and that goes into our economic outlook as a whole. But Workday, I think is a sign of things to come. Because this thing isn't going away.

Chad:

It's getting a little hot in here. That's for God damn sure. We saw a dip in the Dow Jones that was associated to the coronavirus. And again, a lot of that comes to commerce not happening because of travel not happening. And so we've been feeling and hearing about the possibility of the economy slowing and obviously the corona viruse isn't helping. Adecco reports Q4 decline in revenues at 4%, a softness in Europe and slowing in North America. And generally we start to see first with staffing. That's our early indicators for town-

Joel:

Canary in the coal mine.

Chad:

Yeah. So Expedia is cutting 3000 jobs. Business Insider reports as a living costs outpace wage increases. The typical U.S. worker can no longer afford a family on a year's salary. Showing the dire state of America's middle class. So I mean, this is becoming bigger than just the economy slowing. This is actually a trend that we've seen over the last 30 years that is starting to catch up with us.

Joel:

Well, let me give the kids out there a quick little history lesson. You and I have seen two such a dips. The 2000, 2001 recession with the.com bust and obviously 2008 which was the world ending and only rats and cockroaches walking the earth for a couple of years. These are the early signs of stuff could get bad, when you look at these early signs and it's not just the coronavirus is spreading but a lot of this stuff with, start ups laying off people. You've got IPOs going badly for investors. I'm going to be really curious to see if these investments in our space continue, right? If those start drying up and I do think they are a little less than they used to be. I'm going to be watching really closely and I know you are as well.

Chad:

Yeah. Well, in the last two weeks we've had two huge acquisitions slash mergers. So I don't know that anything's slowed down this far. For years we've been touting the economy as it's the best that it's ever been. But we're not rewarding the people who actually do the fucking work. This is the problem, that the raising. Not raising the wages, not helping cancel student debt or at least pay off student debt not paying for the necessary further education to keep their skills up to par. And Mike Germano, CEO of a Communo. Actually said that 40% of the freelancers that they work with, their time is spent learning and getting better and FTE doesn't have time to do that, right? So I think what we're doing is we're not looking at the actual economics of work the way that we should and why do we believe a CEO is worth 1500 times that of an individual who's actually driving the creation of the product or delivery of service?

Chad:

A dude's idea is fucking worthless if the execution isn't applied. We need people to be able to do the work to make that happen. To be able to create product, to be able to deliver services and those individuals, their wages have been stagnant and we've talked about just the minimum wage itself being at the same level it has been for over 10 years and not being able to... There's another story that actually said as CNBC, full time minimum wage workers cannot afford a two bedroom rental anywhere in the U.S. It's just like you are going to say, "Well what about Seymour Indiana?" Anywhere in the fucking us. This is a fucking problem. We're making more profits than we've ever made in our lifetimes or at least that's what we've heard but yet that's going to buy back stock and it's not going to the people who are actually doing the fucking work. This is a big problem.

Joel:

I heard a great quote the other day is, essentially in America we have socialism for the rich and we have rugged individualism for everybody else. And that sums it up. So 2020 is starting out to be a really interesting volatile semi-scary year. So here we go, buckle up boys and girls.

Chad:

Quick rants. Okay, first off, we've got to stop this fucking communism. Socialism versus capitalism bullshit. Capitalism drives prosperity money, right? And it's the best at driving prosperity, which is why we've always done so well. The problem is capitalism sucks and being able to actually deliver prosperity back to the people, which I was just talking about. CEOs getting paid 1500 times that of the people actually creating the product or delivering the service. That's where we've always lived in a hybrid society of capitalism versus almost social programs. We have to think more of hybrid evolution as opposed to this or that. That's my rant.

Joel:

Yeah. Well, look if you're a student of history and I know who you are. The times in history where the money has gone to very few and the very many feel left out and disenfranchised, the pitchfork and the gear teams come out. I'm not saying we're there in America, but there certainly is some opposing views in terms of what our country is currently like and it's probably going to come to a head sooner rather than later. So, rant appreciated and I'm sure it's just one of many more rants that's yet to come as the presidential race heats up and the economy continues to melt down.

Chad:

I need a break.

Joel:

JobAdX could be the break that you need. We'll be right back kids.

JobAdX:

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Joel:

Homie, don't play dat.

Chad:

Homie don't play dat.

Joel:

I thought this was an onion story when I first read it. It's so ridiculous.

Chad:

It is. So Jordi Greenham, the CEO of Mexican longterm rental startup Homie, has resigned after a sexual harassment investigation was carried out by his company's ethics board. Okay, so long story short, this is the tech crunch story. So Greenham had actually met this lady. This unnamed lady through a mutual friend five years ago. And he was obviously feeling a little frisky so he reached out to her on LinkedIn. They started chatting back and forth and she thought that possibly there might be a position open at Homie because it was a growing startup company. And Greenham propositioned her in a WhatsApp message around 1:30 AM on Valentine's day to spend the night with him.

Joel:

Can we recreate the conversation? Do you want to be Homie. The Homie CEO or do you want to be the recipient?

Chad:

Okay. I want to be Homie. Are you ready?

Joel:

Okay, go ahead.

Chad:

Okay, so here's the conversation on WhatsApp. I'll be the Homie CEO Jordi. Hi, I would like to see you.

Joel:

Can you explain to me the random texts at strange hours?

Chad:

No, there is no rational explanation, it was irrational but I understand that it doesn't interest to you. How much could I pay you for one night, 3000?

Joel:

And 3,000 Pesos by the way is $150. So this guy CEO is a big spender when it comes to propositioning young ladies to spend the night with him.

Chad:

But this is connection happened over LinkedIn. We're always talking about LinkedIn and people like the spamming and shit but also the cat fishing.

Joel:

I feel like LinkedIn should change its mantra from a Facebook for professionals to Tinder for professionals because that's more and more what it's becoming.

Chad:

So this is obviously a thing, not just in Mexico because on several occasions I think we've talked about it on the podcast. Pseudo women. I doubt that they're women are always trying to reach out and ask about relationships on LinkedIn. It's like, "What the fuck are you talking about?" Anyway, if you're out there and you're on LinkedIn, beware.

Joel:

And you've got to think that this is maybe worked for this dude before. What are the odds that this is the first time that he's propositioned somebody via LinkedIn? Probably not the first, right?

Chad:

No, I'm thinking it was 1:30 in the morning, he was drunk, he was horny and he was obviously fucking stupid.

Joel:

By the way Homie's now champ startup. They raised $8.2 million. They've gotten money from Sam Zell, who's a really well known billionaire here in America with a long history of stuff. When you have this responsibility in this title don't do this shit. This is just fucking ridiculous.

Chad:

And we out.

Joel:

I got a packet of soup waiting for me, I'm out.

Walken:

Thank you for listening to, what's it called? Podcast. The Chad the Cheese! BRILLIANT!. They talk about recruiting, they talk about technology but most of all they talk about nothing. Just a lot of shout outs of people you don't even know. And yet you're listening, it's incredible. And not one word about cheese but one cheddar. Hello Nacho, pepper jack, swiss, there're so many cheeses and not one word so weird. Anyhow, be sure to subscribe today on iTunes, Spotify, Google play or wherever you listen to your podcasts. That way you won't miss an episode and while you're at it, visit www.chadcheese.com just don't expect to find any recipes for grilled cheese, it's so weird. We out.

#Linkedn #Workday #Cornerstone #Saba #Economy #Travel #Intelycare #Marketplace #Events #Expedia #Homie

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HR's Most Dangerous Podcast

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